resilience speaker
Zak Williams and mental health and resilience speaker, Anne Moss Rogers

The session was called “Turning Pain into Purpose” which focuses a great deal on resilience, hope, and healing. I usually do this as a keynote but changed it up as a workshop to offer examples of how others who’ve lost a loved one to suicide give back after a loss, even examples that have nothing to do with suicide prevention. Because that can be triggering to some and that person still wants to find a purpose for the person they lost.

We discussed different ways to manage the grief, and how the experience no one wanted builds resilience.

What else did they learn? I’ll let my attendees tell you. 🙂

resilience after my son's death by suicide
This attendee is following what her son said, “live on.”
i can have a relationship with my son who died
You can talk about your deceased child or loved one as long as people are talking about their living ones
i worry that since I lost my dad so young i will lose someone else
After a devastating loss from suicide, the reality that we aren’t immune to loss is frightening and makes people fear they will lose someone else.
i can live my passion and still love my son who died
You can have a relationship with your beloved dead
after my son's death, i live because I feel obliged to live
Many parents feel “obliged to live” right after their child dies. Parents who struggle with suicidality should look for help and support.

Want to see more? Here are a bunch on Facebook.

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